WELDED JOINT DESIGN JOHN HICKS PDF

Written by a welding design specialist with 35 years of experience, Welded Joint Design provides a clear and concise explanation of how welded joints and structures are designed and the constraints welding may impose on the design. Thoroughly illustrated, this new edition includes descriptions of the mechanical properties of steel and other structural materials. It will be tremendously valuable to both students and practicing engineers in welding and design, as well as to civil, structural, mechanical and plant engineers who need to learn more about the design of welded products. Explores methods of stress calculation. Briefly reviews various structural design philosophies and their influence on the choice of welding processes and procedures. Includes the particular features of arc-welded joints and their effect on fatigue and fracture behavior.

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By J Hicks. This book contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources. Reprinted material is quoted with permission, and sources are indicated. Reasonable efforts have been made to publish reliable data and information, but the author and the publisher cannot assume responsibility for the validity of all materials.

Neither the author nor the publisher, nor anyone else associated with this publication, shall be liable for any loss, damage or liability directly or indirectly caused or alleged to be caused by this book. Neither this book nor any part may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, microfilming and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from Woodhead Publishing Limited. The consent of Woodhead Publishing Limited does not extend to copying for general distribution, for promotion, for creating new works, or for resale.

Specific permission must be obtained in writing from Woodhead Publishing Limited for such copying. Trademark notice: Product or corporate names may be trademarks or registered trademarks, and are used only for identification and explanation, without intent to infringe. Welding occupies a key position in the manufacture of almost every product which we use; the integrity of the welded joints is vital whether it be a microcircuit or an offshore installation.

At the outset of my career I worked on the development of the tubular electrode and automatic submerged arc welding machines for shipyard use. Although the technologies of welding have now matured their proper application and exploitation still calls for specialist input both in design and in fabrication. The qualified welding engineer is the person who can attend to these specialised requirements and to do this effectively he needs to understand the basis of the design and the significance of the welded details.

At the same time it is important that the practising designer acquires a basic knowledge of the relevant aspects of welding to be able to execute satisfactory designs and, equally important, to know when to seek the input of a qualified welding engineer.

It is therefore a work which should be seen to be of value to both the welding engineer and the design engineer. The profession of the welding engineer is multidisciplinary; many of those coming into it have been educated and trained in electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, production engineering, metallurgy or in other disciplines but do not have a background in the design and construction of welded structures and plant.

I have written this book mainly for such engineers and in so doing I have drawn on my observations as a moderator for the subject of Design and Construction in the European Welding Federation Examinations for Welding Engineer, Technologist and Specialist conducted by TWI in the United Kingdom. Candidates for these examinations are not expected to be able to undertake design work themselves but are expected to have acquired an understanding of the design processes which lead to their being presented with specifications and drawings for fabrications.

The book explains the basis of typical design requirements and decisions which lead to the features characteristic of welded structures and plant. The welding engineer in various industries will come across designs of fabricated structures for buildings, bridges, ships, railway rolling stock, road vehicles, dock gates, cranes and other mechanical handling equipment, pressure or vacuum vessels, pipework and pipelines and all types of machinery.

The significance of the word structures is that it indicates objects or parts of objects which have to carry, or resist, loads. The loads may be the deadweight of the structure itself, something which it carries, a reaction to acceleration, environmental loads, pressure or thermal expansion, etc.

The safe performance of a structure relies on materials and methods of fabrication which can respond to the explicit or implicit design requirements. It is important that the welding engineer has the opportunity of making his specialist input to the design process, and an understanding of the basis of the design will help that contribution to be most effective.

The derivation of many of the relationships which explain the behavior of solids rests on rigorous mathematical analyses whose basis or results may be tempered by assumptions or simplifications in order to arrive at a practical solution. On the other hand, some design criteria are merely empirical values or relations and have no theoretical basis. This book does not attempt to justify, nor in some cases explain in detail the derivation of, the approaches which are used and asks the reader to accept what is written as what is practised to help understand the processes which lead to the creation of a design for a fabricated product.

As a result, the book is not intended to help the reader to become a structural engineer; nonetheless, practising engineers in many industries will find within this book an understanding of the scope and need for specialist welding input to the design of welded structures and plant. I have found in my own experience that what at first sight may seem to be fearsomely complicated methods are quickly understood by performing calculations using the methods. I have for this purpose put some examples in the text.

I have also put some problems at the end of certain chapters with the answers at the end of the book but these are not to be thought of as samples of examination questions. A reader wishing to study any matter in depth is referred to the bibliography at the end of the book.

The process of design of most fabricated products, even at what in some industries is called the conceptual stage, rarely starts with an appeal to first principles. Much design is a reiteration of previous work meeting new functional requirements.

Many of the design criteria are based entirely on the requirements of a standard Specification and there are few products these days which do not have to recognise some industry, national, regional or international standard specifications. Over recent years there has been an enormous increase in the production of new standard specifications in the field of welding and its applications as well as revisions to existing ones. In a large part this has been due to the moves to construct a European based collection of standard specifications through the European Committee for Standardisation CEN which have in many cases been combined with international interests through the International Organisation for Standardisation ISO.

Standards provide a useful basis for national, regional or worldwide compatibility and interchangeability for artefacts and an agreed approach to achieving comparability in design and fabrication methods with the inherent contribution to safety. The apparently comprehensive nature of many modern standards can give them an air of absolute technical and scientific authority; however, they represent only a consensus of views or practices of self-selected groups and can never be vehicles for the use or development of novel concepts or recently acquired knowledge.

They should not be used without an understanding of their engineering or scientific basis or the limitations to the scope of their application. It is therefore imperative that the user has a sound understanding of the basis of the technology so as to be capable of reaching a view on the validity and scope of a standard and to make decisions on matters falling outside the scope of that standard. There is often also the more mundane position where a standard nominated in a contract is inappropriate for the work and the knowledgeable welding engineer can ensure that steps are taken to prevent costly and inappropriate compromises having to be made just to meet what is in effect an irrelevant, or at best ambiguous, requirement.

I am aware that many readers may find it a convenience to have included in a book such as this some of the data which appear in standards, e. The rate at which standards are currently being developed and amended could result in such material rapidly becoming out of date and despite the growth of international standards there are still many national and regional standards in use which differ from each other.

For these reasons I have decided not to include direct quotations from standards except as examples. Materials change in length when they are put under normal or direct stress which can be either tensile or compressive stress.

An elastic material is one in which the change in length is proportional to the stress developed in it and also one in which the material will return to its original length after the stress is removed.

Many metals behave in an elastic. Upload Sign In Join. Home Books Science. Create a List. Download to App. Length: pages 1 hour. Description Based on the European Welding Engineer EWF syllabus Part 3 — Construction and Design, this book provides a clear, highly illustrated and concise explanation of how welded joints and structures are designed and of the constraints which welding may impose on the design.

It is therefore of value both to the welding engineer and the design engineer Many engineers coming into the profession of welding engineering lack a background in design and construction of welded structures and plant. This book has been written with such engineers very much in mind.

It is essential that the welding engineer has the opportunity of making his specialist input to the design process, and an understanding of the basis of the design will help that contribution to be most effective. It is also important that the practising design engineer acquires a basic knowledge of the relevant aspects of welding to be able to execute satisfactory designs and, equally important, to know when to seek the input of a qualified welding engineer.

Designed for both students and practising engineers in welding and design, the book will also be of great value to civil, structural, mechanical and plant engineers. There is also much that will interest test houses, welding equipment and consumable manufacturers, classification societies and steel companies. Related Categories. Cambridge CB21 6AH.

England www. Preface John Hicks The profession of the welding engineer is multidisciplinary; many of those coming into it have been educated and trained in electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, production engineering, metallurgy or in other disciplines but do not have a background in the design and construction of welded structures and plant.

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Welded Joint Design (3rd Edition) by John Hicks

It encompasses the static and fatigue strength of welded joints, the selection of steel grades from the point of view of service and manufacturing requirements, the design of components and structures, and the influence of fabrication methods and procedures on design. A brief overview of welding processes and inspection techniques is included. The revised second edition reflects changes in attitudes to material properties and quality management which originated mainly in the offshore industry and have now permeated other fields of engineering. This edition includes new sections on brittle fracture including descriptions of fracture mechanics tests and their significance to the designer , and on fatigue and the performance of joints under tubular structures. A completely new chapter on quality assurance has been added, and the references to standards UK, American and international have been updated. This book has mainly been written mainly for practicing engineers and draughtsmen, but it will also be of value to students of civil and mechanical engineering as a link between the theory and practice of design.

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